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CIDWT University Curriculum

Lead Institution: University of Arkansas

Funding source: EPA through Washington University in St. Louis

Project Completed June, 2005


Under the University Curriculum project, appropriate modules were developed for teaching a one-semester laboratory and field course in onsite/decentralized wastewater treatment and natural water reclamation systems.  The target audience for the materials is third- and fourth-year engineering students.  The modules can also be adapted for undergraduate and graduate-level university courses in Environmental Health and other non-engineering curricula.  The University Curriculum is available on CD-ROM with a navigational and organizational macro HERE.  The format is such that the materials are accessible and modifiable using software that instructors will have readily available.

 

Introduction to the University Curriculum March_05

 

I. Fundamental Concepts for Environmental Processes (Ann Kenimer, Texas A&M)
II. Site Evaluation (Paul Trotta, Northern Arizona University)
III. Wastewater Characteristics (Mark Gross, University of Arkansas)
IV. Treatment processes
      A. Onsite Nitrogen Removal (Stew Oakley, CSU Chico)
      B. Septic Tanks (Bob Seabloom, University of Washington)
      C. Media Filters for Wastewater Treatment (Ted Loudon, Michigan State University)
      D. A Critical Review of Wetland Treatment Processes (Bob Seabloom, University of Washington) 
      E. Constructed Wetlands: Design Approaches (Scott Wallace, North American Wetland Engineering)
      F. Aerobic Treatment Units (John Buchanan, University of Tennessee and Bob Seabloom, University of Washington) 
      G. Disinfection (Mark Gross, University of Arkansas) 
      H. Soil Treatment Systems  
V. Distribution and Dispersal Systems
      A. Effluent Conveyance (Paul Trotta, Northern Arizona University) 
      B. Drip Dispersal (Bruce Lesikar, Texas A&M)
      C. Spray Dispersal (Bruce Lesikar, Texas A&M)
      D. Water Reuse Systems (Bruce Lesikar, Texas A&M)
VI. Hydraulics and Controls
      A. Hydraulics (Paul Trotta, Northern Arizona University)
      B. Instrumentation and Controls (Paul Trotta, Northern Arizona University)
VII. Septage - Biosolids (Bruce Lesikar, Texas A&M)



 

 


Fundamental Concepts for Environmental Processes Module
Ann L. Kenimer, Associate Professor, Texas A&M University

DESCRIPTION

This module presents, at a rudimentary level, concepts that are required for full understanding of processes and technologies common to decentralized wastewater treatment. This module is aimed at students from non-engineering backgrounds or with limited prior exposure to wastewater treatment methodologies. Suggested prerequisite courses for this module include freshman chemistry, freshman biology, and college algebra. The material contained in this module is likely not appropriate for students who have completed previous courses in wastewater treatment or are from engineering disciplines.

Concepts covered in this module dovetail into other curriculum modules where the concepts are covered in greater detail and depth. Where greater coverage of topics is desired, instructors are encouraged to identify related modules for additional study.

Module materials include a text for student use, slide presentations, lecture notes, and various problem sets for use in and out of the classroom. If used in its entirety, this module will require approximately 12 to 15 hours of course time. Instructors are encouraged to use only those topics in this module that serve the needs of their student body. To facilitate selective use of module concepts, lecture notes, slides, and problem sets are divided according to their relative topic.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  1. Module Perspective (Adobe Acrobat, 7 Kb) (Mar, 2004)
  2. Suggested Course Materials (Adobe Acrobat, 660 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  B. Text
 
  1. Fundamental Concepts Text (Adobe Acrobat, 1.3 MB) (Mar, 2005)
  C. Powerpoint Files
 
  1. Fundamental Concepts Water Quality Powerpoint (Adobe Acrobat 800 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  2. Fundamental Concepts Stoichiometry Powerpoint (Adobe Acrobat 375 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  3. Fundamental Concepts Biology (PowerPoint) (Adobe Acrobat 375 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  4. Fundamental Concepts Units Powerpoint (Adobe Acrobat 410 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  5. Fundamental Concepts for Environmental Processes Mass Balance Powerpoint (Adobe Acrobat 480 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  6. Fundamental Concepts for Environmental Processes Fluids Power Point (Adobe Acrobat 520 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  7. Fundamental Concepts for Environmental Processes Reactions Powerpoint (Adobe Acrobat 500 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  8. Fundamental Concepts for Environmental Processes Sedimentation Powerpoint (Adobe Acrobat 415 Kb) (Mar, 2005)

COMMENTS

 

If you have comments regarding these materials, please send them to Nancy Deal.


  Writing Team:   Review Team:
  Ann Kenimer(Lead)
Julie Villeneuve
Sarah Shelden
  Jennifer Brogdon
Mark Gross
Stan Fincham
James Kreissl



Site Evaluation
by Paul Trotta, Ph.D., Northern Arizona, University, Flagstaff, Arizona

 

DESCRIPTION

Using this module the instructor can teach students about procedures to determine optimal locations for onsite wastewater treatment and disposal systems. The module presents the concepts of preliminary site investigation, field observation techniques and provides information about equipment needed for performing site evaluations.

Suggested prerequisites are basic mechanical drafting skills, rudimentary surveying experience and an understanding of the concept of topography. Prior courses in Trigonometry, Drafting and Surveying are thus helpful.

Module materials include a text for student use, slide presentations and lecture notes. If used in its entirety, this module will require approximately 2 to 4 hours of course time. It is highly recommended students take actual field observations; thus, time spent on this module should be split between classroom and actual field work.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  1. Module Perspective (Adobe Acrobat, 60 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  2. Suggested Course Materials (Adobe Acrobat, 180 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  B. Text
 
  1. Site Evaluation Text (Adobe Acrobat, 1.5 MB) (Mar, 2005)
  C. Powerpoint Files
 
  1. Site Evaluation PowerPoint (Adobe Acrobat, 17 MB) (Mar, 2005)

COMMENTS

 

If you have comments regarding these materials, please send them to Nancy Deal.


  Writing Team:   Review Team:
  Paul D. Trotta
Justin O. Ramsey
David Lindbo
Scott Greene
David Monihan, Jr.
Ben Crysler





Wastewater Characteristics
University of Arkansas

 

DESCRIPTION

This chapter is designed to be used in conjunction with the rest of the materials included in the University Curriculum Development project. It serves as an introduction to other chapters by providing general information on wastewater sources. The instructor may choose to assign the text as supplemental reading or present the PowerPoint during one class period at or near the beginning of a semester course.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  1. Suggested Course Materials (Adobe Acrobat, 45 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  B. Text
 
  1. Wastewater Characteristics Course Module Text- Adobe Acrobat (3.2 MB), (Mar, 2005)
  C. Powerpoint Files
 
  1. Wastewater Characteristics PowerPoint- Adobe Acrobat (2.6 MB), (Mar,2005)

COMMENTS

 

If you have comments regarding these materials, please send them to Nancy Deal.


  Writing Team:   Review Team:
Mark A. Gross Nancy Deal
John Buchanan



 

Onsite Nitrogen Removal Module
California State University, Chico

 

DESCRIPTION

This module covers in detail the theory of biological nitrogen removal through nitrification and denitrification, and rigorously examines various technologies that have been used for onsite nitrogen removal. The module is designed for advanced students in civil/environmental engineering or environmental science who have had coursework in chemistry, biology or microbiology, and wastewater treatment. The module has been developed to teach fundamental concepts so that students will be better able to address nitrogen removal issues in their professional work.

Module materials include a text for student use with figures, a power-point presentation, and various example problem sets related to each section in the text. This module will require approximately 11 hours of lecture time.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  1. Module Perspective (Adobe Acrobat, 65 Kb) (Mar, 2004)
  2. Suggested Course Materials (Adobe Acrobat, 260 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  B. Text
 
  1. Nitrogen Course Module Text- Adobe Acrobat (1.1 MB) Mar, 2005
  2. Text Figures
  C. Powerpoint Files
 
  1. Power Point Presentation- (Adobe Acrobat 2.3 MB) (Mar, 2005)

COMMENTS

 

If you have comments regarding these materials, please send them to Nancy Deal.


  Writing Team:   Review Team:
  Stewart Oakley   Aziz Amoozegar
James C. Converse
Barbara Dallemand
Nancy Deal
George Loomis

 

Septic Tank Module
University of Washington, Seattle

 

DESCRIPTION

This module describes the history, materials of construction, and the physical, chemical, and biological processes that take place within the septic tank. It emphasizes that it is a marvelous cost efficient and energy free reactor and absolutely is a necessary part of small scale wastewater treatment systems. It accomplishes approximately fifty percent of the ultimate treatment without which downstream treatment schemes most certainly would fail.

The Course is intended for senior civil engineering and environmental health students who have previously completed an introductory course in environmental engineering.

The course goals/learning objectives are to make students aware that the much maligned septic tank is actually a marvel of simplicity and an energy free unit that provides the first and very important pretreatment of the wastewater in small scale wastewater treatment systems. To produce students who have a sound fundamental knowledge about the physical, chemical, and biological processes that take place within the septic tank. To inform them about the capability of the septic tank to renovate household wastewater and to inspire them to realize that it is the most important treatment unit in the small scale wastewater treatment system. The history, materials of construction, sizing, processes within the septic tank, sedimentation, theory, compartmentation, biological decomposition, aerobic decomposition, anaerobic decomposition, solid accumulation rate, septage pumping intervals, garbage grinders, buoyancy, effluent filters and screens, and additives.

The course presentation method will depend upon the instructor’s past experience and teaching method preference. Most likely the standard lecture method using audio-visual aids, such as overhead projector and Power Point.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  1. Module Perspective (Adobe Acrobat, 7 Kb) (Mar, 2004)
  2. Suggested Course Materials (Adobe Acrobat, 470 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  B. Text
 
  1. Septic Tanks Text (Adobe Acrobat, 2.6 MB) (Mar, 2005)
  C. Powerpoint Files
 
  1. Course Overview PowerPoint (Adobe Acrobat, 3.3 MB) (Mar, 2005)

COMMENTS

 

If you have comments regarding these materials, please send them to Nancy Deal.


  Writing Team:   Review Team:
  Robert Seabloom
Terry Bounds
Ted Loudon
  Mike Hoover
Tom Konsler
Steven P. Dix
Jim Kreissl
John R. Buchanan
James C. Converse
Kitt Farrell-Poe
Jerry Stonebridge
Kevin Sherman
Bruce Lesikar
George Heufelder
David Lenning

 

Media Filters
Module Leader Ted Loudon


DESCRIPTION

The material in this module can be used to teach courses with various agendas. It can be used for a complete presentation (or set of presentations) completely covering the field of media filters. Another approach would be to use portions of the materials to teach selected topics such as single path sand filters, recirculating sand filters, proprietary media filters or maintenance and monitoring of media filters.

The intent of the media filter module is to provide sufficient detailed materials so that someone who may be familiar wastewater treatment but not necessarily with media filters can teach the full module or portions thereof as indicated above. Media filters provide an effective, passive method of achieving a high level of secondary wastewater treatment with a simple, low energy system that requires relatively little maintenance. Media filters are likely to be used extensively for individual homes, small communities, sub-divisions and some commercial facilities in the future. Knowledge of media filters and their design will be important to engineers and public health officials in years to come.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  1. Module Perspective (Adobe Acrobat, 7 Kb) (Mar, 2004)
  2. Suggested Course Materials (Adobe Acrobat, 70 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  B. Text
 
  1. Media Media Filters Text (Adobe Acrobat, 3.5 MB) (Mar, 2005)
  C. Powerpoint Files
 
  1. Media Filters PowerPoint (Adobe Acrobat, 9.3 MB) (Mar, 2005)

COMMENTS

If you have comments regarding these materials, please send them to Nancy Deal.

  Writing Team:   Review Team:
  Ted Loudon
Terry Bounds
James Converse
John Buchanan
  Randy Miles
Dave Lenning
Nancy Deal
Bill Cagle
Kitt Farrell-Poe

A Critical Review of Wetland Treatment Processes Module
University of Washington, Seattle

 

DESCRIPTION

 

This module introduces the student to a relatively new technology for use in treating small scale wastewater flows. The capabilities and limitations of two types of constructed wetlands [free water surface (FWS) and vegetated submerged bed (VSB)] are discussed. In spite of the great amount of resources devoted to their proper use, design, application, and performance, there are four common misconceptions regarding these technologies. These misconceptions are discussed in an attempt to put their use into proper perspective.

The history and terminology pertaining to constructed wetlands and large polishing wetlands are covered. The removal mechanisms for pollutants such as biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), total suspended solids (TSS), nitrogen, phosphorous, pathogens, metals and trace organics are outlined. Construction, operation, maintenance, and design considerations are also discussed.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  1. Module Perspective (Adobe Acrobat, 63 Kb) (Mar, 2004)
  2. Suggested Course Materials (Adobe Acrobat, 175 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  B. Text
 
  1. Constructed Wetlands Text (Adobe Acrobat, 1.1 MB) (Mar, 2005)
  C. Powerpoint Files
 
  1. Course Overview PowerPoint (Adobe Acrobat, 1.2 MB) (Mar, 2005)

COMMENTS

 

If you have comments regarding these materials, please send them to Nancy Deal.


  Writing Team:   Review Team:
  Robert Seabloom
Adrian Hanson
  Jim Kreissl
Richard Otis
David Lindbo
Scott Wallace
Mike Hoover
Mark Gross

Constructed Wetlands: Design Approaches Module
Scott Wallace,P.E., North American Wetland Engineering

 

DESCRIPTION

The topic for this course module is the application of constructed wetland systems (free water surface and vegetated submerged beds) to solve wastewater treatment problems in the context of decentralized wastewater management.

The primary target audience is upper division (junior and senior) engineering undergraduate students. Graduate students in engineering or environmental science disciplines would also benefit from this material. It is assumed that the students using this material are already grounded in the fundamentals of wastewater treatment.

The goal of this module is to familiarize students with how wetland treatment systems function, and to introduce them to design methods commonly in use today. Because this is an evolving technical discipline, many older design methods are outdated and result in unrealistic treatment expectations. Consequently, designers considering the use of treatment wetlands need to understand the strengths and weaknesses of different design methods, and be open to new developments in the field.

Upon completing this module, students will have been introduced to the two main types of constructed wetlands (free water surface and vegetated submerged beds), and will have been exposed to five methods of designing wetlands that are in common use today. Comparing and contrasting these design methods provides important insights into the “degree of certainty” offered by the current level of understanding within the constructed wetland field.

This course module includes text, PowerPoint lecture material, example problems, and a bibliography/reference list for more detailed information.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  1. Module Perspective (Adobe Acrobat, 75 Kb) Jan, 2004
  2. Suggested Course Materials (Adobe Acrobat, 560 Kb) Mar, 2005
  B. Text
 
  1. Constructed Wetlands Text (Scott Wallace) (Adobe Acrobat, 2.1 MB) (Mar, 2005)
  C. Powerpoint Files
 
  1. Constructed Wetlands Power Point (Scott Wallace) (Adobe Acrobat, 2.9 MB) (Mar, 2005)

COMMENTS

 

If you have comments on this activity please send them to Scott Wallace P.E.,North America Wetland Engineering, P.A.


  Writing Team:   Review Team:
  Scott Wallace   Jim Kreissl

Aerobic Treatment Module
University of Tennessee
University of Washington, Seattle

 

DESCRIPTION

This module provides specific information about aerobic treatment units as a means of providing rapid oxidation of carbonaceous and nitrogenous compounds found in domestic wastewater. While the module is directed toward engineering students, it is fully anticipated that most science-based undergraduate students will be able to understand and apply the concepts contained within the module.

Overall, the objectives of this module are to provide a review of the biochemical oxidation of soluble and colloidal organic compounds using aerobic microbial digestion, provide descriptions of various engineered systems that maintain high- rate digestion, and provide an understanding of the operation and maintenance required to keep these system functional. This module is divided into two sections: (1) the aerobic treatment process and (2) aerobic treatment units. The design of biological treatment units can be roughly divided into two categories: suspended-growth and attached- growth. The bio-processes used to convert organic carbon into inorganic carbon is the same in both categories. Citations are provided in the module to direct the reader to textbooks that can provide a more rigorous explanation about processes involved in biological wastewater treatment.

Onsite and decentralized wastewater management systems can take advantage of technologies developed for centralized municipal treatment systems. Aerobic treatment units can be an option when insufficient soil is available for the proper installation of a traditional septic tank and soil absorption area. Increasingly, homes and small commercial establishments are being constructed in rural areas with no central sewer and on sites with marginal soils. In these situations, wastewater must receive a high- level of pretreatment before being discharged into the soil environment. Depending on local regulations, the use of an aerobic treatment unit may allow for reductions in the required infiltration area and/or reduction in depth to a limiting soil layer. This ability to produce a high-quality effluent may open sites for development that were previously unsuitable because of soil.

The instructor is encouraged to tailor the material in this module to best fit the objectives of the class. This module is part of an overall curriculum developed for teaching the concepts of decentralized wastewater management and treatment. While this module is intended as a standalone source of information about aerobic treatment units, for a more complete understanding of the engineered-processes references are available to direct the students to more rigorous text.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  1. Module Perspective (Adobe Acrobat, 80 Kb) (Mar, 2004)
  2. Suggested Course Materials (Adobe Acrobat, 200 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  B. Text
 
  1. Aerobic Treatment Unit Module Text (Adobe Acrobat, 355 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  C. Powerpoint Files
 
  1. Aerobic Treatment of Wasterwater Part 1 - PowerPoint (Adobe Acrobat, 700 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  2. Aerobic Treatment of Wasterwater Part 2 - PowerPoint (Adobe Acrobat, 2.5 MB) (Mar, 2005)

COMMENTS

 

If you have comments regarding these materials, please send them to Nancy Deal.


  Writing Team:   Review Team:
  Robert Seabloom
John Buchanan
  Bill Cagle
John Higgins
Jim Kreissl
Adrian Hanson
Steven P. Dix
Tom Konsler
James C. Converse
Bruce Lesikar

Disinfection Module
Dr. Mark Gross, University of Arkansas and Dr. Kitt Farrell-Poe, University of Arizona

DESCRIPTION

This section presents the concepts of wastewater disinfection as it applies to onsite and decentralized systems. Although the processes are the same for small wastewater flows as they are for large wastewater flows, some of the applications are different. In particular, tablet chlorination and liquid chlorination are typical solutions for disinfecting small flows, whereas gas chlorination using one-ton cylinders of chlorine gas is the typical method chosen for gas chlorination in large wastewater treatment plants. Also, when disinfecting wastewater prior to using a soil dispersal system for final treatment and dispersal, considerations must include the effect of the residual disinfectant upon the beneficial soil organisms. The material in this section includes discussions of disinfection agents including, chlorine, ultraviolet light, and ozone.

The goal of this course module is to teach students the concepts and chemistry of wastewater disinfection and allow them to become some of the methods available for wastewater disinfection. The students will be able to select the appropriate disinfection system for a decentralized wastewater treatment system and compute necessary dosage rates for chemical disinfection.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  1. Module Perspective (Adobe Acrobat, 57 Kb) (Mar, 2004)
  2. Suggested Course Materials (Adobe Acrobat, 205 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  B. Text
 
  1. Disinfection Text (Adobe Acrobat, 1.2 MB) (Mar, 2005)
  C. Powerpoint Files
 
  1. Disinfection Powerpoint (Adobe Acrobat 2.2 MB) (Mar, 2005)

COMMENTS

 

If you have comments regarding these materials, please send them to Nancy Deal.


  Writing Team:   Review Team:
  Mark Gross
Kitt Farrell-Poe
  John Higgins
Paul Trotta
Jennifer Brogdon
Tibor Banathy


Treatment of Onsite Wastewater Constituents by Soil


DESCRIPTION

This chapter is currently unassigned. When developed, this curriculum will be designed for use with students who are in college and probably of junior standing or higher. It is further assumed the students getting this material will have completed introductory college level chemistry, physics, algebra and a biological science class as well as have either some soil science, engineering or related environmental education. The objectives of this section of the University Curriculum are to not only provide content but to provide a demonstration of the application of basic scientific information.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  B. Text
 
  C. Powerpoint Files
 

COMMENTS

 

  Writing Team:   Review Team:

 

 

Effluent Conveyance
Paul Trotta, Ph.D., Northern Arizona University

 

DESCRIPTION

This module is aimed at students from engineering backgrounds or with prior exposure to hydraulic methodologies. Suggested prerequisite courses for this module include college algebra, fluid mechanics and engineering hydraulics. If students do not have the adequate prerequisites they should complete the Hydraulics Fundamentals and Energy Chapters presented in the Hydraulics Module of the University Curriculum.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  1. Module Perspective (Adobe Acrobat, 70 Kb) (Mar, 2004)
  2. Suggested Course Materials (Adobe Acrobat, 1 MB Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  B. Text
 
  1. Effluent Conveyance Text (Adobe Acrobat, 2.5 MB) (Mar, 2005)
  C. Powerpoint Files
 
  1. Effluent Conveyance Powerpoint (Adobe Acrobat, 1.8 MB) (Mar, 2005)

COMMENTS

 

If you have comments regarding these materials, please send them to Nancy Deal.


  Writing Team:   Review Team:
  Paul Trotta
Justin O. Ramsey
  Jim Janecek
Jim Kreissl
Tom Konsler
Stew Oakley
Morgan Powell


Drip Dispersal Systems Module
Dr. Bruce Lesikar, Ph.D., Texas A&M University

 

DESCRIPTION

Drip dispersal is a method for distributing effluent into the soil for final treatment and reuse of the effluent. The key considerations for effectively using this technology are presented in this module. The course target audience includes upper division (junior and senior) undergraduates and graduate students from engineering and non-engineering disciplines.

The course goal is to provide students a basic understanding of how drip dispersal systems can effectively disperse wastewater into soils for final treatment and reuse of the effluent. Upon completing this module, students will have a fundamental understanding of the components of a drip dispersal system, knowledge of how the components can be connected together to form a system, and an understanding of how the components interact to form a functional wastewater treatment and dispersal system.

Topics included in this course module include: why use a drip dispersal system; how the system interacts with the soil; function of the drip system components; key drip system design considerations; drip system installation and start-up considerations; operational requirements; and maintenance issues.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  1. Module Perspective (Adobe Acrobat, 70 Kb) (Mar, 2004)
  2. Suggested Course Materials (Adobe Acrobat, 200 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  B. Text
 
  1. Drip Distribution Course Module Text- Adobe Acrobat (385 Kb), (Mar, 2005)
  C. Powerpoint Files
 
  1. Chapter 1 Drip Introduction, Components, Emitters and Soil PowerPoint (Adobe Acrobat 1.5 MB), (Mar, 2005)
  2. Chapter 2 Drip Components PowerPoint (Adobe Acrobat 5.5 MB), (Mar, 2005)
  3. Chapter 3 Drip Dispersal Drip Emitters and Soil PowerPoint (Adobe Acrobat 2 MB), (Mar, 2005)
  4. Chapter 4 Drip System Design - PowerPoint (Adobe Acrobat 3.4 MB), (Mar, 2005)
  5. Chapter 5 Drip System Installation PowerPoint- (Adobe Acrobat 4 MB), (Mar, 2005)
  6. Chapter 6 Drip System Start Up PowerPoint- (Adobe Acrobat 1.6 MB), (Mar, 2005)
  7. Chapter 7 Drip System O&M - PowerPoint- (Adobe Acrobat 1.6 MB), (Mar, 2005)

COMMENTS

 

If you have comments regarding these materials, please send them to Nancy Deal.


  Writing Team:   Review Team:
  Bruce Lesikar
James Converse
  Brian Britain
Steven Berkowitz
Michael Hines
Dick Otis

 

Spray Dispersal Module
Dr. Bruce Lesikar, Ph.D., Texas A&M University

 

DESCRIPTION

Spray dispersal is a method for distributing effluent on the surface of the soil for final treatment and reuse of the effluent. The key considerations for effectively using this technology are presented in this module. The target audience includes upper division (junior and senior) undergraduates and graduate students from engineering and non-engineering disciplines.

The course goals is to provide students a basic understanding of how spray dispersal systems can effectively disperse wastewater into soils for final treatment and reuse of the effluent. Upon completing this module, students will have a fundamental understanding of the components of a spray dispersal system, knowledge of how the components can be connected together to form a system, and an understanding of how the components will interact to form a functional wastewater treatment and dispersal system.

The course module includes topics such as: reasons to use a spray dispersal system; water quality requirements for using this dispersal technology; function of the spray system components; key spray system design considerations; spray system installation and start-up considerations; system operational requirements; and maintenance issues. This course module includes syllabus, text, lecture notes, example problems to be worked by the instructor, in-class problems to be worked by students, PowerPoint notes, and out-of-class problems.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  1. Module Perspective (Adobe Acrobat - 64 Kb), Mar, 2004
  2. Suggested Course Materials (Adobe Acrobat - 180 Kb), Mar, 2005
  B. Text
 
  1. Spray Dispersal Course Module Text (Adobe Acrobat - 900 Kb), Mar, 2005
  C. Powerpoint Files
 
  1. Chapter 1 Spray Dispersal (PowerPoint - 1.5 MB), Mar, 2005
  2. Chapter 2 Spray System Components (PowerPoint - 1.1 MB), Mar, 2005
  3. Chapter 3 Spray Site Consideration (PowerPoint - 500 Kb), Mar, 2005
  4. Chapter 4 Spray Design Consideration (PowerPoint - 1.7 MB), Mar, 2005
  5. Chapter 5 Installation Considerations (PowerPoint - 300 Kb), Mar, 2005
  6. Chapter 6 Operation and Maintenance Considerations (PowerPoint - 500 Kb), Mar, 2005

COMMENTS

 

If you have comments regarding these materials, please send them to Nancy Deal.


  Writing Team:   Review Team:
  Bruce Lesikar
Vance Weynand
Matthew Lilie
  Dana Porter




Water Reuse Systems Module
Dr. Bruce Lesikar, Ph.D., Texas A&M University

 

DESCRIPTION

The topic for this course module is wastewater reuse. Wastewater is an important component of our water resources. A greater emphasis will be placed on recycling our wastewater in the future. The course presentation topics include a description of the nature of wastewater reuse and other important terms; how wastewater can be a water resource; a discussion of health considerations when reusing wastewater; mechanisms for reusing wastewater and key considerations when implementing that mechanism; key design considerations, operational requirements, and management issues. This course module includes syllabus, text, lecture notes, example problems to be worked by the instructor, in-class problems to be worked by students, PowerPoint notes, and out-of-class problems.

The course goal is to provide students a basic understanding of the mechanisms for reusing wastewater to reduce fresh water usage. Since wastewater contains constituents with potential health and environmental risks, proper management is essential for safe and effective use of this resource. Upon completing this module, students will have a fundamental understanding of how wastewater can be reused, an understanding of potential health risks associated with wastewater reuse, and a functional knowledge of the mechanisms for reuse and the critical constituents to be evaluated to see if the wastewater is suitable for reuse through that mechanism.

The course presentation topics: include what is wastewater reuse and description of important terms, how wastewater can be a water resource, health considerations when reusing wastewater, mechanisms for reusing wastewater and key considerations when implementing that mechanism, key design considerations, operational requirements, and management issues. This course module includes syllabus, text, lecture notes, example problems to be worked by the instructor, in-class problems to be worked by students, PowerPoint notes, and out-of-class problems.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  1. Module Perspective (Adobe Acrobat, 70 Kb) (Mar, 2004)
  2. Suggested Course Materials (Adobe Acrobat, 180 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  B. Text
 
  1. Water Reuse Course Module Text- Adobe Acrobat (800 Kb), Mar, 2005
  C. Powerpoint Files
 
  1. Chapter 1 Wastewater Reuse, Chapter 2 Applications for Reclaimed Water, Chapter 3 Design Considerations, Chapter 4 Management, Chapter 5 Operation, Chapter 6 Public Health Considerations, Chapter 7 Public Education - PowerPoint (Adobe Acrobat - 3 MB) Mar, 2005

COMMENTS

 

If you have comments regarding these materials, please send them to Nancy Deal.


  Writing Team:   Review Team:
  Bruce Lesikar
Byonghi Lee
Don Waller
  Kevin Sherman
Kathy Cupps



Hydraulics In Onsite
Northern Arizona University

 

DESCRIPTION

This module presents concepts that are required for full understanding of hydraulic principles common to decentralized wastewater treatment. The module contains four chapters or sub-modules: Hydraulic Fundamentals I; Hydraulic Energy II; and Pumps III.

This module is aimed at students from non-engineering backgrounds or with limited prior exposure to hydraulic methodologies. Suggested prerequisite courses for this module include college algebra and soils. Students who have previously had fluid mechanics and engineering hydraulics should be able to skip the Hydraulic Fundamentals chapter, simply review the Hydraulic Energy and Pump chapters, and then quickly advance into the Gravity and Pressure Distribution Modules.

Knowledge of concepts covered in this module will be required to successfully complete other curriculum modules where the concepts are covered in greater detail and depth. Where greater coverage of topics is desired, instructors are encouraged to identify related modules for additional study. Module materials include a text for student use, slide presentations, lecture notes, and various problem sets for use in and out of the classroom. Instructors are encouraged to use only chapters and topics that serve the needs of their student body.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  1. Module Perspective (Adobe Acrobat, 7 Kb) (Nov, 2003)
  2. Suggested Course Materials (Adobe Acrobat, 520 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  B. Text
 
  1. Hydraulics I Text (Adobe Acrobat, 630 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  2. Hydraulics II Text (Adobe Acrobat, 475 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  3. Hydraulics III Text (Adobe Acrobat, 800 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  4. Hydraulics IV Text (Adobe Acrobat, 500 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  C. Powerpoint Files
 
  1. Hydraulics I Basics Powerpoint (Adobe Acrobat 1 MB) (Mar, 2005)
  2. Hydraulics II Energy Powerpoint (500 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  3. Hydraulics III Pumps Powerpoint (800 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  4. Hydraulics IV Groundwater Powerpoint (235 Kb) (Mar, 2005)

 

COMMENTS

 

If you have comments regarding these materials, please send them to Nancy Deal.


  Writing Team:   Review Team:
  Paul D. Trotta
Justin O. Ramsey
  Jim Janecek
Jim Kreissl
Tom Konsler
Stew Oakley
Morgan Powell




Controls in Onsite Systems
Northern Arizona University

 

DESCRIPTION

This module provides students a basic understanding of the various mechanisms for controlling the treatment and disposal processes of onsite wastewater. The module is broken into four chapters or sub-modules: I - Overview; II - Mechanical Controls; III - Electro-Mechanical Controls; and IV - Design Considerations. Examples of various controls are discussed in an effort to allow the student to gain a better understanding of each method and develop of a functional knowledge of the processes.

This course is aimed at students from non-electrical engineering backgrounds. The concepts discussed are rudimentary principles of controlling the movement of wastewater. The module does not discuss electrical concepts. Suggested prerequisite courses for this module include college algebra, trigonometry, geometry and physics.

Module materials include a text for student use, slide presentations, lecture notes, and various problem sets for use in and out of the classroom.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  1. Module Perspective (Adobe Acrobat, 60 Kb) (Mar, 2004)
  2. Suggested Course Materials (Adobe Acrobat, 184 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  B. Text
 
  1. Controls Text (Adobe Acrobat, 1.7 MB) (Mar, 2005)
  C. Powerpoint Files
 
  1. Controls Overview PowerPoint (Adobe Acrobat, 700 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  2. Controls Mechanical PowerPoint (Adobe Acrobat, 800 Kb) (Mar, 2005)
  3. Controls Electrical PowerPoint (Adobe Acrobat, 1 MB) (Mar, 2005)
  4. Controls Design PowerPoint (Adobe Acrobat,  450 Kb) (Mar, 2005)

COMMENTS

 

If you have comments regarding these materials, please send them to Nancy Deal


  Writing Team:   Review Team:
  Paul Trotta
Justin Ramsey
  Brian Bishop
Bill Cagle
Jim Janecek
John Tester
Don Waller
Richard Rankka
Joe Zimmerman




 

Septage - Biosolids Module
Dr. Bruce Lesikar, Ph.D., Texas A&M University

 

DESCRIPTION

The topic for this course module is septage management. Residuals are a component of every on-site wastewater treatment system and must be properly handled to implement an effective management program.

The course audience includes upper division (junior and senior) undergraduates and graduate students from engineering and non-engineering disciplines.

The course goal is to provide students a basic understanding of septage and how it can be safely managed. Upon completing this module, students will have:

  1. a fundamental understanding of septage,
  2. an understanding of potential risks associated with septage usage
  3. a functional knowledge of the mechanisms for septage treatment and management.

Topics included in this course module include:

  1. what is septage
  2. public health risks associated with septage usage
  3. septage treatment methods
  4. land application considerations
  5. land application methods

The course presentation methods include syllabus, text, lecture notes, example problems to be worked by the instructor, in-class problems to be worked by students, PowerPoint notes, and out-of-class problems.

MATERIALS

  A. Instructors Guide
 
  1. Module Perspectives (Adobe Acrobat - 60 Kb), Oct, 2004
  2. Suggested Course Materials (Adobe Acrobat - 170 Kb), Mar, 2005
  B. Text
 
  1. Biosolids Module Text (Adobe Acrobat, 480 Kb) Mar, 2005
  2. Biosolids Handout Materials (Adobe Acrobat, 45 Kb) Mar, 2004
  3. Biosolids Site Specific Record (Adobe Acrobat, 115 Kb) Mar, 2005
  C. Powerpoint Files
 
  1. Septage-Biosolids and Application PowerPoint (Adobe Acrobat - 1.4 MB), Mar, 2005

COMMENTS

 

If you have comments regarding these materials, please send them to Nancy Deal.


  Writing Team:   Review Team:
  Bruce Lesikar
Ann Kenimer
Dave Gustafson
  Dana Porter

 

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